Can I Practice Yoga at Home?

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yoga

yoga

“Can I practice yoga at home?” is a question I am often asked by yoga beginners. When you first start yoga it can feel quite daunting to practice yoga by yourself at home. However, as we all know “practice makes perfect” and, while the goal of yoga is not “perfection per se”, the more you practice, the easier it becomes for you to achieve your personal health and wellness goals.

Seven Golden Tips To Remember When You Practice Yoga at Home

1. Like any other discipline, it is essential you first gain a thorough introduction into yoga postures before attempting to practice by yourself at home. There are lots of very good yoga for beginners DVDs on the market and most book stores sell a selection of yoga books which cover the essential poses.

2. If possible, enroll on a yoga for beginners course or attend a drop-in class at your local yoga studio. This will give you first hand experience under the watchful eye of a yoga instructor. This is the ideal place to learn yoga and then at home you can practice one or two of your favourite poses.

3. It is better to practice little and often. If you can, spend 5 – 20 minutes every day practicing yoga. Your home practice can consist of a variety of yoga asanas, maybe a sequence which you learnt at class; a few minutes breathing or meditation. The key is to get into the routine of practicing on a regular basis.

4. Be gentle with yourself. Sometimes, life gets in the way and it is not possible to practice as much as you would like. Maybe you have recently given birth, or suffered a loss in the family. In these cases, a few gentle poses or just resting in savasana (the Corpse Pose) can quietly restore and re-balance your emotions. At all times, remember to listen to your body and treat yourself with respect and care.

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Yoga and Buddhism: Similarities and Differences

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Yoga

Yoga

Yoga and Buddhism are sister traditions which evolved in the same spiritual culture of ancient India. They use many of the same terms and follow many of the same principles and practices. For this reason it is not surprising that many of us born in the West, particularly after an initial exposure, are apt to regard Yoga and Buddhist teachings as almost identical.

We may want to combine their teachings or practices accordingly, as if there were no real differences between them. The differences that have existed between the two systems historically, which have kept them apart as separate traditions, are less obvious to us in the West than are their commonalities. Or those who study one of these traditions may be inclined to see the other as a borrowing from it. Those who study Buddhism may find so much similarity in Yoga that they suspect a strong Buddhist influence on Yoga. Those who study Yoga may find so much similarity in Buddhism that they see a strong yogic influence on Buddhism.

However, the tendency to find commonality between these two great spiritual traditions is not limited to the West. Swami Vivekananda, the first great figure to bring Yoga to the West, examined the Buddhist Mahayana scriptures (Sutras) and found their key teachings and those of Vedanta that he followed to be ultimately in harmony. In recent years with the influx of Tibetan refugees into India, including the Dalai Lama, there has been a new dialogue between the two traditions that is bringing about greater respect between them. Tibetan Buddhists often appear at Hindu religious gatherings and partake in all manner of discussions.

Yoga for High Blood Pressure

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Yoga

Yoga

High blood pressure may be caused by several factors, the primary ones being stress and fatigue (which lead to kidney/adrenal exhaustion). For students who are overly stressed, it is best to evaluate what is causing the stress and then customize the practice accordingly.

If the stress is stagnant – caused by too much sitting in a chair – the student should be taught sequences like Suryanamaskar (Sun Salutation) and other high-energy asanas, as well as groin openers in the form of mild backbends. If the students frequently work at computers, sequences that include shoulder and upper-back openers – like Gomukhasana (Cow Face Pose), Garudasana (Eagle Pose), Parvatasana (interlocking the hands overhead, palms up), and Paschim Nanaskarasana (reverse Namaste), all of which can be done seated in a chair – can also help

How to Reduce Neck and Shoulder Tension

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Shoulder Tension

Shoulder Tension

Do you spend a large portion of your day at work using a computer? After working for a period of time, how do you feel when you get up to take a break? If you stand up to take a break or go to another meeting, how does your body feel? Do you feel alert, energised and agile or does your body ache? Most likely, when you stand up, your neck and shoulders feels stiff and sore, or your lower back is painful and tight.

When your neck is sore, stiff or tense it is hard for you to concentrate and focus on your work. Sometimes the pain is so bad, your shoulders start to ache and you it is painful for you to do simple every day tasks. Yoga offers you an easy and effective way to reduce neck pain and release shoulder tension.Your neck and shoulders are prone to tension build-up, especially if you have a stressful and demanding work schedule. Gentle yoga exercises help to release tension from your muscular and nervous system.Yoga Sequence To Reduce Neck And Shoulder Tension The following easy to follow yoga sequence can be used anytime during your day, particularly when the pressure is on.

Please consult your doctor before undertaking any exercise, especially if you suffer from any form of back or neck pain. Always listen to your body and treat your body with respect and care. As you practice this sequence remember to take your time to breathe slowly, fully and deeply, through your nose Aim to do each yoga exercise 5 – 10 times and where necessary, repeat on the opposite side.

Yoga Exercise

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Yoga Exercise

Yoga Exercise

If you are still blaming someone for a past event, here’s one way to gain a deeper understanding of the situation so you can end the blame game. And then use this yoga exercise to open your heart and breathe it all in. An old wound Recall an event in your life that did create a lot of pain, and now you feel at peace with it. You have understood that life lesson. Your life even changed significantly and you would give yourself about a 90% mark for letting it go. May I encourage you to look even closer now, and check to see whether you still hold a faint hint of blame or anger, believing it was that entire person’s fault.

3 ways you might have kept the anger-

1. Every time you remember the event, you mostly see the other individual and the significant part they played, which was actually an inauspicious part in your mind’s eye.

2. You totally forget or avoid thinking of the individual you hold some anger towards, and only recount your journey of how you managed to cope with the trying situation.

3. You speak only of the life lesson, and what action you have resolved never to repeat again.
and to change their life..