GOES-13 Satellite

GOES-13 Satellite

the north of Tomas are associated with a cold front off the eastern U.S. coast. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created today’s GOES-13 image, and other images and animations using GOES satellite data.

During the morning hours of Nov. 5, Tomas’ maximum sustained winds were around 85 mph and is a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. noted that Tomas could strengthen further today, then begin to weaken on Saturday, Nov. 6.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles especially northeast through southeast of the center. That makes the storm about 280 miles stretching from northeast to southeast.

At 8 a.m. EDT on Nov. 5, Tomas’ center was about 80 miles south-southeast of Guantanamo, Cuba and 160 miles west of Port Au Prince Haiti, near 18.8 North latitude and 74.7 West longitude. Minimum central pressure is near 987 millibars. Tomas is moving to the northeast near 10 mph, and is expected to speed up over the next couple of days.

At 9 a.m. EDT, the airport at Port Au Prince, Haiti was reporting rain with easterly winds near 14 mph, gusting to 25 mph. Satellite imagery at 9:47 a.m. EDT showed Tomas’ cloud cover extended from the Dominican Republic in the east, westward to Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo, Cuba. Turks and Caicos Islands were also under Tomas’ cloud cover at that time.

Tomas’ center was western Haiti this morning (Nov. 5), near extreme eastern Cuba today, and over the southeastern Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands later today and tonight.

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