GOES-13 catches

GOES-13 catches

13 satellite keeps a continuous eye on the eastern half of the U.S. and Atlantic Ocean basin, and has provided meteorologists with an infrared look at a strengthening Tropical Storm Tomas this morning. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites like GOES-13 are managed by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations from the GOES satellite data. When GOES-13 provided an infrared image (because it was taken at night) today, Nov. 2 at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Tomas showed a little more organization in its clouds after battling wind shear yesterday.

Infrared satellite data also showed that convection (rapidly rising air that form the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) has increased or deepened in Tomas. This morning most of that convection and thunderstorm activity is occurring over the eastern and northeastern areas around the center of circulation.

The wind shear over the south-central Caribbean Sea has weakened which has allowed Tomas to gradually re-strengthen. The waters are also much warmer than the 80 degree threshold needed to maintain or strengthen a tropical cyclone. Because of these improving conditions, the National Hurricane Center forecasts that Tomas will continue strengthening until Friday when an upper-level trough (elongated area of low pressure) will push Tomas north-northeastward toward the Windward Passage and parts of Hispaniola.

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