Climate-change

Climate-change

A doubling of abnormally wet or dry summer weather in the southeastern United States in recent decades has come from an intensification of the summertime North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH), or “Bermuda High.” And that intensification appears to be coming from global warming, according to a new analysis by a Duke University-led team of climate scientists.

The NASH is an area of high pressure that forms each summer near Bermuda, where its powerful surface center helps steer Atlantic hurricanes and plays a major role in shaping weather in the eastern United States, Western Europe and northwestern Africa.

The team’s analysis found that as the NASH intensified, its area grew, bringing the high’s weather-making western ridge closer to the continental United States by 1.22 longitudinal degrees a decade.

Advertisements