Inorganic-le

Inorganic-le

An international team of researchers has devised a way to embed tiny light emitters and light sensors into stretchable, bendable, twistable sheets. The flexible systems might someday find use as implanted sensors to keep tabs on biological processes.

Now researchers have bridged the gap between organic and inorganic LEDs by harnessing the light of conventional electronics in an elastic system with biomedical potential. “The applications we’re interested in mostly include interfaces with the human body,” says John Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and a co-author of a paper published online October 17 in Nature Materials describing the advance. For some biological applications, he adds, a conventional LED’s brightness, reliable operation and suitability for waterproof  implementation make it a more attractive option than an organic LED. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.)

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