Exercise-tv-health

Exercise-tv-health

Even infants are drawn to the boob tube with its bewitching, transfixing blend of moving images and sound. And despite decades of concern about the influence of television and recreational computer use on children—coupled with newer worries about childhood obesity—researchers are still parsing out how this ever-expanding amount of screen time is affecting their well-being.

Despite the worries, TV use among the youngest viewers has continued to increase over the years. U.S. kids aged two to 11 now watch more than 25 hours of (non-prerecorded) television a week, which boils down to an average of more than three and a half hours a day, according to a 2010 Nielsen report. The American Academy of Pediatrics, however, recommends no more than one to two hours of “quality programming” a day, listing “violent or aggressive behavior, substance use, sexual activity, obesity, poor body image and decreased school performance” as among possible ramifications of too much unguided TV viewing. And research from the past few years has shown that children who spend more downtime in front of a screen are more likely to have emotional, social, conduct and concentration problems.

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