Satellite

Satellite

13 satellite has been keeping an eye on Tropical Storm Lisa and watched her birth, graduation to depression then tropical storm and back to depression. Now, Lisa has grown back to tropical storm status, but it may be short-lived. At 11 a.m. EDT on Friday, Sept. 24, Tropical Storm Lisa had maximum sustained winds near 50 mph and she may strengthen and weaken over the weekend, but by Sunday colder waters will zap her energy source and she is forecast to be a depression.

Meanwhile, on Sept. 24, she was still frolicking in the eastern Atlantic, about 320 miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near 18.9 North latitude and 27.8 West longitude. Lisa was moving north at 7 mph and is expected to turn north-northwest on Sept. 25. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars.

The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lisa at 16 45 UTC (12:45 p.m. EDT) on Sept. 24. The GOES visible imagery showed that Lisa now has a well-organized center of circulation, which corresponds with infrared and microwave satellite imagery that showed convection has wrapped around three-fourths of the center of circulation.

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