Tripzine_albpsi

Tripzine_albpsi

Psychedelics are back! As readers of Scientific American know, scientists have recently reported that psychedelics show promise for treating disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety in terminal cancer patients. This weekend, researchers and other enthusiasts are gathering in New York City for a two-day celebration, “Horizons: Perspectives on Psychedelics,” sponsored by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, or MAPS, along with other groups.

Overall, I’m thrilled by the psychedelic revival. I’ve had good trips, which gave me first-hand evidence of the drugs’ therapeutic potential. But like many other people, I’ve also had bad trips, which left me feeling alienated from, rather than blissfully connected to, the world. In fact, it’s worth recalling that the godfather of psychedelic research—the chemist Albert Hofmann, whom I interviewed before his death in 2008—occasionally harbored doubts about these potent drugs.

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