NASA Goddard MODIS

NASA Goddard MODIS

Hurricane Igor is a monster hurricane in terms of strength and size. To get a perspective on its size, it is the same distance from one end of the storm to the other as it is from Boston, Mass. to Richmond, Va., some 550 miles. That’s a 10-hour drive from one end to the other, and NASA satellites captured that entire distance in one image. Because Hurricane Igor is a large storm and even if Igor doesn’t make a direct landfall in Bermuda, the extent of the winds (the wind field) is so large that the National Hurricane Center noted that Bermuda can be buffeted by winds of hurricane-force or tropical storm-force on its current track.

Hurricane Igor was captured in one image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite at 1420 UTC (10:20 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 14. The image showed the massive extent of Igor’s cloud cover, stretching over 500 miles. The image also showed that Igor’s eye was covered with high clouds.

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