Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm

Tropical Depression 12 was born in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean yesterday, Sept. 12 and two NASA satellites saw factors that indicated she would later strengthen into Tropical Storm Julia. Infrared imagery from NASA’s Aqua satellite revealed strong convection in its center that powered the storm into tropical storm status by 11 p.m. EDT. NASA’s TRMM satellite indicated very heavy rainfall from that strong area of convection. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA’s Aqua satellite gives scientists and meteorologists clues about how a tropical cyclone is behaving by providing critical temperature data.

When Aqua flew over Tropical Depression 12 early on Sept. 12 the concentration of strong convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) were large and surrounded the depression’s center. Cloud top temperatures over a large area were as cold or colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit, and those thunderstorms were strong. The convection continued on Sept. 12 and the storm finally strengthened into Tropical Storm Julia.

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