Replace-animals

Replace-animals

It likely comes as no surprise that many common household chemicals and medical products as well as industrial and agricultural chemicals, may irritate human skin temporarily or, worse, cause permanent, corrosive burns. In order to prevent undue harm regulators in the U.S. and beyond require safety testing of many substances to identify their potential hazards and to ensure that the appropriate warning label appears on a product. Traditionally, such skin tests have been done on live animals—although in recent decades efforts to develop humane approaches, along with ones that are more relevant to people have resulted in new models based on laboratory-grown human skin.

At the same time, manufacturers are slated to use millions of animals in the coming decade to comply with a 2007 European Community program called Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), which has requested more extensive safety evaluations for approximately 30,000 chemicals.

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