Eating-in-the-Dark

Eating-in-the-Dark

As psychologist Benjamin Scheibehenne and his wife left the restaurant where they had just finished dinner, they discussed whether to stop somewhere else for dessert. It was an everyday decision, one they had made countless times before, but this particular evening they could not make up their minds.
“When we came out of the restaurant, we didn’t really know whether we were still hungry or not,” Scheibehenne recalls. “We realized we were completely clueless about how much we actually consumed.”
The couple’s appetite for dessert owed its ambivalence to the unusual nature of their dining experience: The Scheibehennes had visited a “dark restaurant,” where sight-impaired waiters serve customers their meals in a total blackout—a trend that claims to enhance the sensory experience of eating, and which has gained popularity in Europe and Asia, with some inroads into the U.S.

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