NASA TRMM, Hal

NASA TRMM, Hal

Tropical Storm Frank was wavering overnight in the eastern Pacific Ocean, just off the southwest Mexican coast, and recent satellite data has confirmed that convection has strengthened within the storm. GOES-11 captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Frank early this morning and it appeared that the cloud cover was disorganized, but NASA’s TRMM satellite looked “under the hood” of the storm and saw Frank powering back up. At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT) Tropical Storm Frank’s winds were near 65 mph. Frank was centered about 145 miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico near 15.4 North and 101.4 West. That’s also about 160 miles south of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. Frank was moving west-northwest at 7 mph and had a minimum central pressure of 994 millibars.

Microwave satellite data (such as that that flies on TRMM) was also helpful in determining that Frank is not moving as quickly as previously believed. Frank is now moving west-northwest near 7 mph.

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