Dartmouth-HELP-blog

Dartmouth-HELP-blog

Editor’s Note: Students from Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering are working in Tanzania to help improve sanitation and energy technologies in local villages. The student-led group, known as Humanitarian Engineering Leadership Projects (HELP), will file dispatches from the field during their trip. This is their fourth blog post for Scientific American.

KIGOMA—After getting only a few hours of sleep, Wendy and I woke up and headed to the airport in Dar es Salaam. The plane was pretty small so we felt every single shake, and all the turbulence a person could handle. As we stared out the window, we saw many of the “wild” fires (slash and burn) that are responsible for the smoky haze in Kigoma. After about three hours in the air, we landed on a dirt runway. When I stepped out, I breathed in fresh air and smiled; we had finally reached Kigoma, our home for the next two months. That night, we ate dinner with the remaining members of the group except for Kanika and Zach, who had already left to go to Mwamgango, a small village north of Kigoma on Lake Tanganyika.

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